Creating an Animated Login Form for TouchID

I came across this amazing Dribbble shot by Jakub Reis a while back. It caught my eye and I knew that I just had to try recreating it in code. At that moment, I didn’t know how. I tried out a bunch of different things, and about a year later, I finally managed to make this demo.

I learned a couple of things along the way, so let me take you on a little journey of what I did to make this because you may learn a thing or two as well.

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What makes someone a good front-end developer?

We recently covered this exact same thing, but from the perspective of a bunch of developers.

Chris Ferdinandi weighs in:

The least important skills for a front-end developer to have are technical ones.

The nuances of JavaScript. How to use a particular library, framework, or build tool. How the cascade in CSS works. Semantic HTML. Fizz-buzz.

Chris takes that a little farther than I would. I do think that with an understanding of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, the deeper the better, and that it is an ingredient in making a good front-end developer. But I also agree it's much more than that. In fact, with solid foundational skills and really good soft skills (e.g. you're great at facilitating a brainstorming meeting), you could and should get a job before they even look at your language skills.

Why isn’t it <style src=””>?

The way JavaScript works is we can do scripts as an inline block:

<script>
  let foo = "bar";
</script>

Or, if the script should be fetched from the network...

<script src="/js/global.js"></script>

With CSS, we can do an inline block of styles:

<style>
  .foo { color: red; }
</style>

So why not <style src=""></style>? Instead, we have <link href=""/>.

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An Introduction and Guide to the CSS Object Model (CSSOM)

If you've been writing JavaScript for some time now, it's almost certain you've written some scripts dealing with the Document Object Model (DOM). DOM scripting takes advantage of the fact that a web page opens up a set of APIs (or interfaces) so you can manipulate and otherwise deal with elements on a page.

But there's another object model you might want to become more familiar with: The CSS Object Model (CSSOM). Likely you've already used it but didn't necessarily realize it.

In this guide, I'm going to go through many of the most important features of the CSSOM, starting with stuff that's more commonly known, then moving on to some more obscure, but practical, features.

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Google Labs Web Components

I think it's kinda cool to see Google dropping repos of interesting web components. It demonstrates the possibilities of cool new web features and allows them to ship them in a way that's compatible with entirely web standards.

Here's one: <two-up>

I wanted to give it a try, so I linked up their example two-up-min.js script in a Pen and used the element by itself to see how it works. They expose the component's styling with custom properties, which I'd say is a darn nice use case for those.

See the Pen <two-up&rt; by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

What do you name color variables?

I remember the very first time I tried Sass on a project. The first thing I wanted to do was variablize my colors. From my naming-things-in-HTML skillz, I knew to avoid classes like .header-blue-left-bottom because the color and position of that element might change. It's better for the to reflect it what it is than what it looks like.

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Compound Components in React Using the Context API

Compound components in React allow you to create components with some form of connected state that’s managed amongst themselves. A good example is the Form component in Semantic UI React.

To see how we can implement compound components in a real-life React application, we’ll build a compound (multi-part) form for login and sign up. The state will be saved in the form component and we’ll put React’s Context AP to use to pass that state and the method from the Context Provider to the component that needs them. The component that needs them? It will become a subscriber to Context Consumers.

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Edge’s Announcements

The public-consumption blog post:

Ultimately, we want to make the web experience better for many different audiences. People using Microsoft Edge (and potentially other browsers) will experience improved compatibility with all web sites, while getting the best-possible battery life and hardware integration on all kinds of Windows devices. Web developers will have a less-fragmented web platform to test their sites against, ensuring that there are fewer problems and increased satisfaction for users of their sites; and because we’ll continue to provide the Microsoft Edge service-driven understanding of legacy IE-only sites, Corporate IT will have improved compatibility for both old and new web apps in the browser that comes with Windows.

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DRY State Switching With CSS Variables: Fallbacks and Invalid Values

This is the second post in a two-part series that looks into the way CSS variables can be used to make the code for complex layouts and interactions less difficult to write and a lot easier to maintain. The first installment walks through various use cases where this technique applies. This post covers the use of fallbacks and invalid values to extend the technique to non-numeric values.

The strategy of using CSS Variables to drive the switching of layouts and interactions that we covered in the first post in this series comes with one major caveat: it only works with numeric values — lengths, percentages, angles, durations, frequencies, unit-less number values and so on. As a result, it can be really frustrating to know that you're able to switch the computed values of more than ten properties with a single CSS variable, but then you need to explicitly switch the non-numeric values of properties like flex-direction or text-align from row to column or from left to right or the other way around.

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CSS Selectors are Conditional Statements

.foo {

}

Programmatically, is:

if (element has a class name of "foo") {

}

Descendent selectors are && logic and commas are ||. It just gets more complicated from there, with things like combinators and pseudo selectors. Just look at all the ways styles can cascade.

Jeremy Keith:

If you find you can’t select something in the CSS, that’s a sign that you probably need to add another class name to the HTML. The complexity is confined to the markup in order to keep the CSS more straightforward, modular, and maintainable.

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